Matt Shinners’s 2013 February LSAT Predictions

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UPDATE: LSAC has closed some February LSAT testing centers in the northeast due to an approaching blizzard. Check this LSAT blog post for more.

Making predictions for the February LSAT is a liberating experience. As the only unreleased LSAT of the year, I can say pretty much anything without fear of being proven wrong.

Plus, I can’t get it as wrong as those Mayans, amirite?

2013 February LSAT Prediction I: Logic Games

Logic Games have been flip-flopping between obscenely difficult (think Zones) and remarkably easy over the past few LSATs. That trend, according to my palantir (yes, I’m a nerd), is going to end this weekend.

Expect a section of moderate difficulty. If we were going to scale this between 1 (easy) and 5 (difficult), expect a few 3s and a few 3.5s. I expect one game to be more difficult, but not so difficult that it causes people in droves to flee the LSAT testing center, cancel slips in hand and tears in their eyes.

And, finally, I expect to see a Rule Replacement question in there.

2013 February LSAT Prediction II: Logical Reasoning

On the December LSAT, Logical Reasoning was, by many accounts, a killer. There was one remarkably tough section, and there were definitely some questions on there that seemed completely unintelligible (space colonization, anyone?). We also saw the resurgence of the Crux question.

After the drubbing people took on the December LSAT, expect the LR to be of moderate difficulty this time around. I’d still expect to see many principle questions, and I’m going to predict a few more diagrammable questions than we’ve seen in recent years. Also, in the spirit of seeing rare question types pop up more frequently, I’m thinking Agree questions are going to make a bit of a comeback on the February LSAT.

Overall, though, I don’t expect anything remarkable here.

2013 February LSAT Prediction III: Reading Comprehension

Prepare for a drubbing.

Reading Comprehension in December wasn’t too bad. When students say it wasn’t too bad, it usually means it was even easier than that (sitting in that room makes everything seem more intense).

I’m expecting there to be a very difficult science passage. I’m also expecting a history passage on a subject that will be both esoteric and difficult (early Mesopotamian farming, possibly).

Don’t look for an author with a strong, straightforward opinion. There will most likely be nuance to their viewpoints, and it’ll be buried in the viewpoints of others. Only subtle cues will let you know with whom the author agrees.

Also, expect a synthesis passage.

2013 February LSAT Prediction IV: The LSAT Curve

After two -10 LSAT curves (the number you could get incorrect and still score a 170), we saw a -12 LSAT curve on the December LSAT. With a moderation of difficulty on LR, and with no predicted standout Games (the traditional LSAT score killer), let’s split the difference with a -11.

For a 160 LSAT score, let’s again split the difference with a -26. And a 152 will be -40.

2013 February LSAT Prediction V: Specific Predictions

LSAT Logic Games

• Expect a rule replacement question (maybe a second, more straightforward one as well)
• Expect a game with animals
• Expect the toughest game to be a combo game

LSAT Logical Reasoning

• Several Agree questions
• Must be False will rear its ugly head
• A question on prison systems

LSAT Reading Comprehension

• Ridiculous prediction: Mesopotamian farming
• There will be a synthesis passage
• A lot of subtle author’s attitude
• One very difficult science passage

Feb 7, 2013 - 12:05 pm - By Matt Shinners
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2 Responses to Matt Shinners’s 2013 February LSAT Predictions

  1. Monty says:

    Good call on the agree Q..

  2. Jarrett Ezekiel Reeves says:

    Does the difficulty level of the February administration of the LSAT usually have more predictive power over the June exam (since the February exam is non-disclosed) than the previous September/October or December exam?

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